Canine heroes, Richard Gere

The saddest movie I ever saw was Hachi: A Dog’s Tale.

In the movie, Richard Gere portrays a dog owner that has a special connection with a stray dog he takes into his home.

A big, beautiful Husky, Hachiko immediately captures the man’s heart with his playful and loving nature.  The very next day, Hachi manages to escape the fenced back yard, so he can accompany Richard Gere‘s character to the train station as he’s leaving for work.

He breaks free again when he hears the train that evening, and ventures out to greet his new master, who’s on his way home now.

It becomes a daily ritual.  As they make their way back and forth to the train, playing fetch, and laughing, the dog scurries about him, jumping, and barking happily.  The bond between them grows even stronger.

Then, suddenly, the man dies.

For the rest of the movie (and the rest of his life), the dog patiently waits at the train for his master to return, despite many passionate entreaties from the man’s wife for Hachi to come home.   He steadfastly refuses to leave, and maintains his watch, year after year, until he passes on himself.

All this is based on a true story.

It’s sad to watch, but uplifting in a way.

The people of this Japanese town adopt Hachiko, feed him, pet him, and care for him from then on.

He inspired them.

He reminded them of friendship, loyalty, and faith…values that were being tested as their deeply traditional ways became modernized.

We’re often guilty of letting life separate us from the bare essence of who we were meant to be.  And there’s a sort of simplicity and joy in the unconditional love of a pet that reminds us not to worry about how to be — but to just be.

21st century living will test your values from time to time.

And make no mistake, when you show up as anything less than the best *you* you can be, the world pays a steep price for it.

Hachiko, a stray dog, became the symbol of an entire culture.

He’s even got a statue dedicated to him in the town square.

That’s the power of authenticity.

The fastest way to separate yourself from your true nature is by not feeling well, physically or otherwise.

Take care of yourself.

Take care of that body.

Don’t deprive the world of the gift of you – not even for a second.

Yours In Great Health,

Conor Kelly
conorkelly.com