My new year’s resolution (sort of)

Ok, so The Conz don’t make resolutions.

But one thing I’d like to start doing more of again is going for long walks.

I walk a lot in general.

I mean the ones of the forty-minutes-or-longer variety.

I’ve got so much to do it’s easy to talk myself out of it.  And with it being winter…well, that just whips up the rationalization hamster wheel even more.  I admit I was shamed into lacing up my walking boots at least once last winter when I heard my 83-year-old clients were still getting their daily 90-minute ‘constitutional’ despite the very-sub-zero temperatures.

All that aside, I’ve found few things better for my wellbeing.

I don’t count steps.  There’s no target mileage.  I just walk.  And I watch.  I stare at things off in the distance.  I let my body tell me if I should keep going or make for home.  Another point: no treadmills allowed on this particular journey.  You see, we Homo sapiens have a primal need to be outside…and most of us city-dwelling folk don’t do it nearly enough.

By the way, I’ve found this to be a great way to come up with content – little creativity tip for ya.

Some of my best emails have been ‘direct downloads’ I channeled during a walk, and that I couldn’t type out fast enough once I sat back down at my keyboard.  I also get ideas for what to do.  Solutions to problems or puzzles I’ve been struggling with often occur to me in the same fashion.

Many great thinkers knew this little secret.  Einstein’s daily walk was sacred to him.  Darwin did three 45-minute walks per day.

What’s the point of such ramblings?

I invite you to join me in boosting the step count, if you’re not already.

It doesn’t have to be every day.

We can aim for two or three days a week.

Just do this consistently and you’ll be amazed at what happens.

Then, write me back and share your story.

I’ll be genuinely curious.

See you out there,

Conor Kelly

P.S. In my next email marketing tip (Tuesday) I reveal the #1 thing you must do in every email if you want to make sales.  Get this one thing right, and you can do pretty much do everything else wrong and still get business.

Not too late to subscribe:

Go here to subscribe to my email marketing tips.

 

A better brain when you bite this bitter bean

Say my title six times in a row, fast.

I had fun with that one.

Why stop there?

That is not all.

I shall go full nerd, and to Dr. Seuss call…

As for the brain benefits, they’re a result of THIS bitter bean.

Click to allow images and you’ll see exactly what I mean.

Chocolate

This bitter bean is chocolate.  My favorite (pictured) much too dark.

At 100% cacao its taste is more like chewing to chew bark.

Its benefits are many, a food fit for kings and queens.

We now turn our tale to the brain and amyloid precursor proteins.

(Ol’ Seuss never had to rime that one.)

“Explain,” you say?

I will not delay:

Amyloid precursor proteins are agents of cell repair, abundant in the brain.  After the age of 25, bits of these proteins break away and form plaque buildup in nerve axons and the synapses between cells, impeding the flow of neurochemicals much like plaque in the arteries impedes blood flow.

Over time, as this plaque accumulates, it gunks up the machinery and leads to a loss in cognition and memory – even Alzheimer’s.

Polyphenols, found in chocolate (black tea is another source) have been shown to prevent this plaque from forming.  The best chocolate is organic, of course.  It doesn’t have to be 100% cacao like my Gratitude above, but the higher the better.

I recommend two squares a day of the highest percentage you still enjoy.

There you have it.

A simple brain tip – sussed out and Seuss-ed out.

Don’t forget…

When biting a bitter bean has a better brain as a benefit…

That benefit is a boon to any bright, bold believer that bites this bitter bean.

: )

Happy Chocolate Eating,

Conor Kelly

P.S.  Find out how I get my clients 3x-10x their email marketing results using simple, fun emails like this one.  Join the many that have already jumped and subscribe to my NEW newsletter with tips on how to make more sales from email (click the link below and you’ll automatically be added):

=>Click here to get The Conz’ email marketing tips.

Hockey hall-of-famer proves The Conz’ wily ways

I’m not gonna say I told you so…

Between clients the other day I decided to grab a quick sesh in the Four Seasons gym.

And who was beside me as I crushed a pec workout?

None other than legendary defenseman Scott Stevens.  If you don’t know, Scott used to be the captain of the New Jersey Devils.  He’s a multiple Stanley Cup winner, and a Conn Smythe Trophy recipient as MVP of the Stanley Cup finals.

He was in town for a Hall of Fame dinner.

Known for his physical style of play, at one time he held the record for both # of games played by a defenseman, and number of penalty minutes by a hall-of-famer.

So I hadz to know…

“Hey Scott, how’s your body these days?  Banged up?”

(I did notice he looks great, by the way.  Ripped.)

He said, “no all good, thankfully.”

Then he went on to explain that he attributes much of this to his #1 supplement: omega 3 fatty acids.  Apparently, he’s been taking them religiously for 20 years and the ‘ol joints are muy bueno.

Hmm.

Sounds familiar.

Where have I heard this before?

Oh right.

May 2007: I create my general nutrition guidelines which I give to every new client.  Item # 6 (of only 6) is ‘supplement with essential fatty acids’.

June 2009: The Conz tells a reporter from The Toronto Sun that essential fatty acids are my most recommended supplement.

October 2015: I write that if I was stranded on a deserted island, and I could have one supplement, it’s me omegas:

Click here to visit the article.

Must I go on?

Full disclosure…

I don’t think this supplement is the ONLY reason Scott’s still feeling good these days (he’s 54).  He’s obviously kept up much of the discipline he had as a pro athlete.

But it’s a factor.

Quash inflammation, release fat, boost immunity, lubricate joints, feed brain cell membranes, improve skin, hair and nails — all potential upsides of this badass nutrient.  Scientists estimate we consumed about 7,000mg of omega 3’s per day in our ancient diet, yet today the average is less than a fifth of that.

Of course it’s only one piece of the puzzle.

Get ye the rest here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

Find out what other secrets I teach, that the venerable Mr. Stevens also swears by.

Happy Omega 3-ing,

Conor Kelly
Hall Of Fame Personal Trainer


The Tiger Woods story that inspires cold showers

I’m almost 100% certain this post’s content isn’t going to be about what my subject line made you think it is.

Let’s check back later and see if I’m right…

Down to last four holes at the 2001 Masters (which Tiger Woods would go on to win, completing the slam of holding all four major titles at once), some tool snapped a camera shudder at the top of his backswing.

Amazingly, Tiger pulled up mid swing.

But that wasn’t the best part.

After shooting the guy a 2-second death stare, he took a couple of breaths, then stepped up and crushed it 300+ yards straight down the middle.

Those stakes.

That pressure.

What do you want to bet most mere mortals would have taken the bait, and let the whole thing upend their concentration?

In this instance, and many others, Tiger was able to use what Stephen Covey calls “the pause button”.

Most of us are very Pavlovian in our responses (Pavlov was famous for training dogs to salivate at the sound of a bell by associating that sound with chow time).

We’re conditioned to react to things in our environment.

Phone rings, we pick it up.

Stephen Covey’s pause button is about using the ‘space’ between stimulus and response to proactively choose our responses rather than merely reacting to things.

In our story today, the phone was ringing, but Tiger wasn’t home.

(He was too busy becoming a legend.)

What’s so useful about this particular skill?

Instead of being at the mercy of whatever direction the wind blows, or whipped around on a stormy sea of emotions, you can learn to be poised, clear-headed, and yes happy a high percentage of the time.

What could be better?

This is something I aspire to.

In fact, I deliberately train non-reactivity.

One of the ways you can do this is by means of physical challenges.

Basking in cold water is an example.  The way I see it, if you can allow cold water to rain on your bare skin for up to two minutes while staying relaxed and controlling your breathing (I’ve even started singing when I do this) then you’ve seeded the feeling on non-reactivity into your nervous system.

Give it a whirl.

At the end of your morning shower, turn the water temp as cold as possible.  Stay relaxed.  Try 30 seconds at first and work your way up.

(This has other health benefits, btw.  Improves circulation, reduces inflammation, boosts immunity and promotes hormonal health.)

Ok, one last thing before I go.

The #1 way to foster non-reactivity is by eating well, working out, and cleaning up your sleeping patterns.

If only I had a nickel for every time a client has commented on how all the little things that used to bother them now roll off their back.

(Ok so it wouldn’t be that much…but I’d have enough for an espresso…)

Get your state under control here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

That does it for today.

All about that sweet, sweet ability to own your own emotional state.

Well?

What kind of story did you think this was gonna be?

😉

Happy Non-Reacting,

Conor Kelly

4 tips for a better memory

I like the character of Mike Ross on Suits.

If you don’t know the show, Mike’s talent is his insane photographic memory.  He remembers every line of every conversation he’s ever had.  He remembers every book he’s ever read, word for word.  He can look at a legal document once, then type it out verbatim hours or days later.

I’d kill to be able to do all of that.

Maybe sell my soul?

Track down a reclusive master in a remote Mongolian monastery?

Scratch that…

I’ll settle for these 4 memory tips instead:

1. Meditate.  In a recent study, researchers found that participants in a 9-week meditation retreat markedly improved their ability to focus, and displayed the same boost when measured 7 years later.  What’s interesting is the benefits lasted whether they maintained their level of meditation or not.

More’s not necessarily better.

I do 15-20 minutes a day.

To me this is all about training yourself to be present.

When you’re truly aware in the moment you notice more, and every experience can take deeper root within you.

2. Supplement with R+ALA and Acetyl-l-carnitine.  You lose a quarter of your cholinergic neurons between the ages of 25 to 75.  These are cells that produce the neurotransmitter acetylcholine which is essential to memory.

In combination these nutrients have been shown to reverse cell damage in aged rats.  In some cases, these good ‘ol boys got back the memory and motor skills of their youth.

I recommend an age-dependent dose of 200mg-800mg of R+ALA and 500mg-2,000mg of Acetyl-l-carnitine (in the morning) daily.  The older you are, the more you need.

These are the bread and butter of my personal brain health program.

(It goes without saying, any supplementation you undertake is at your own discretion and risk.)

3.  Learn a new language.  This is probably the least practical suggestion of the four, but the hippocampus (the brain’s center for processing memories) lights up on brain scans of language learners.

Mas cerveza, por favor?

4. Pump iron.  Here’s what we know: estrogen in women, and testosterone in men = intelligence (I know, hard to believe, isn’t it?).  We also know that unless you regularly challenge your muscles with heavy weight (10-12 reps seems to be the sweet spot) you can’t hope to maintain your body’s hormone cascade.

Once those hormones start circling the drain (as they do with regular aging), cognition and memory disappear with them.

I can help with all these in varying degrees, but ‘specially that last one.

Get your IQ boost here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

I’m excited.

I’m gonna pound out another value-packed email for my small biz marketing list, then it’s time for my Bulgarian lesson.

Maybe the devil can’t have my soul just yet…

Happy Remembering,

Conor Kelly

Sleep better using this simple rule

I like this.

It comes from fitness guy turned productivity expert, Craig Ballantyne.

Here it is…

The 10-3-2-1 rule.

No caffeine 10 hours before bed.

No food or alcohol 3 hours before bed.

No work 2 hours before bed.

No technology 1 hour before bed.

If there’s one I’m a little lax on it’s no food 3 hours before bed.

Just the nature of my days I guess.

I get home late and I’m often still short of my protein and calorie goals so I’ll raid my fridge.  It’s good eats, and usually still two hours before bed, so close enough.  I also happen to think if you’re more than a little hungry by that point, you should eat, even if it’s just 15-20 snacktacular almonds.

Also, further comment on the caffeine thing…

I used to drink coffee at 3pm or 4pm and not have it disrupt my sleep.

It does now.

And it took me a while to clue in to that little fact.

I share this because one’s metabolism can change.

Be open to changing with it.

For more simple rules that let you live slimmer, happier, and healthier, kick your heels together three times and you’ll wind up here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

It may not be Oz, but there is a wizard to be found there. 😉

Happy Sleeping,

Conor Kelly

86 yr old gets his groove back

In my career, I’ve had several clients start training with me AFTER the age of 85.

In one case, the client’s main goal was to be able to walk more confidently because he hated younger, stronger pedestrians zipping around him on the sidewalk.

He made great strides too.

(Pun intended.)

And the biggest benefit of his workouts?

His family reported a noticeably better MIND. He could express himself more clearly, seemed more “with it”, full of humor and wit, and his short term memory was on the rise.

All of this used to surprise me.

Not these days.

I’ve seen so many dramatic turnarounds in older adults now that I expect it.

The science bears this out as well.

The physical benefits lifting weights (greater strength, mobility, posture, and balance) are just the tip of the iceberg.

Aside from oxygenating the brain and releasing neuronal growth factors essential to learning, we now know that unless you challenge your muscles with resistance on the regular, you can’t maintain your body’s hormone cascade. And as your hormones nose dive with usual aging, so does your intelligence, memory, and ability to enjoy positive emotions like friendship, joy and confidence.

I bring this up because I’ve had a great track record with folks in their late 70’s and 80’s.

And I want more success stories.

I can think of few things more rewarding than helping someone get back quality years in their life.

So who do you know with that many candles on their most recent birthday cake?

Maybe it’s a parent or grandparent even.

If they’re anywhere near downtown Toronto (and still relatively mobile), I’d love an opportunity to meet with them and see if I can give them the same gift.

Pass along my number, 416 826 4844.

It’s literally the best thing you could do for them.

Anyway, I’m about to board a plane to Vegas, baby.

Seminar, not party time.

But I do love a good knowledge hangover.

Ha.

Until next time…

Happy Lifting,

Conor Kelly