86 yr old gets his groove back

In my career, I’ve had several clients start training with me AFTER the age of 85.

In one case, the client’s main goal was to be able to walk more confidently because he hated younger, stronger pedestrians zipping around him on the sidewalk.

He made great strides too.

(Pun intended.)

And the biggest benefit of his workouts?

His family reported a noticeably better MIND. He could express himself more clearly, seemed more “with it”, full of humor and wit, and his short term memory was on the rise.

All of this used to surprise me.

Not these days.

I’ve seen so many dramatic turnarounds in older adults now that I expect it.

The science bears this out as well.

The physical benefits lifting weights (greater strength, mobility, posture, and balance) are just the tip of the iceberg.

Aside from oxygenating the brain and releasing neuronal growth factors essential to learning, we now know that unless you challenge your muscles with resistance on the regular, you can’t maintain your body’s hormone cascade. And as your hormones nose dive with usual aging, so does your intelligence, memory, and ability to enjoy positive emotions like friendship, joy and confidence.

I bring this up because I’ve had a great track record with folks in their late 70’s and 80’s.

And I want more success stories.

I can think of few things more rewarding than helping someone get back quality years in their life.

So who do you know with that many candles on their most recent birthday cake?

Maybe it’s a parent or grandparent even.

If they’re anywhere near downtown Toronto (and still relatively mobile), I’d love an opportunity to meet with them and see if I can give them the same gift.

Pass along my number, 416 826 4844.

It’s literally the best thing you could do for them.

Anyway, I’m about to board a plane to Vegas, baby.

Seminar, not party time.

But I do love a good knowledge hangover.

Ha.

Until next time…

Happy Lifting,

Conor Kelly

 

Longevity secrets of the richest man in history

It’s estimated that, at one point, John D. Rockefeller’s fortune exceeded $300 Billion.

Move over, baby Gates.

In fact, that’s enough to buy Bill Gates AND Warren Buffet several times over.

At 53, Rockefeller controlled most of the world’s oil.

But his health was failing.

He developed alopecia and shed all his hair.

Eyebrows.

Everything.

He could barely eat.

In a matter of months he’d lost 50 pounds from an already thin frame, and cut a gaunt, ghostly figure.  His doctors made it clear that if he didn’t retire now, he wouldn’t be around much longer.

See, John D. was a ball of anxiety.  He was slowly crumbling under the burden of his enormous wealth.  He once said, “I never put my head on the pillow at night without reminding myself I could lose it all tomorrow.”

Imagine the stress that caused.

So here are the instructions his doctor gave him:

1. Never worry about anything. Ever.
2. Always stop eating when you’re still a bit hungry.
3. Spend more time outside engaging in light activity.

Well, John D. took this advice to heart.

The senior Mr. Rockefeller was a different chap.

He never worried again.  Even when his life’s work, Standard Oil, was being picked apart by politicians for anti-trust reasons, Rockefeller stayed out of the office.

In his latter years he became the colorful, soundbite-worthy old codger he’s remembered as…the guy who, when asked by his driver why his son tips so much better than he does, replied, “he’s got a rich father.”

Alright, and secret #4 in this longevity protocol?

He started giving all his money away.

Medicine, science, education…so much of the progress we enjoy today can be traced back to Rockefeller’s generosity.

The result?

From one foot in the grave at 53, he lived to be 98.

That’s 45 years on borrowed time.

Not too shabby, wouldn’t you say?

Here’s what I’d like you take away from this.

(1) #’s 1-3 is pretty damn good advice.  If more doctors doled that out these days instead of anti-depressants, we’d be a much healthier society.

AND

(2) GIVE.  John D. Rockefeller spent the first half of his life trying to get, but wasn’t truly happy until he dedicated himself to giving.

This has everything to do with your fitness program, btw.

And anything else you want out of life.

Tony Robbins famously said, “the reason you’re suffering is you’re focused on yourself.”

Giving shifts your focus away from YOU.

It allows you to be immersed in what you’re doing, in contribution, without the fears, doubts and anxieties that can tend to inject themselves when you’re overly SELF-conscious.

And most people are so busy trying to GET the result they want, they never fully GIVE themselves to the process involved.

Ask not what your fitness program can do for you, ask what you can do for your fitness program.

Damn.

A lot of value right there.

Hope you caught it.

I just told you WHAT to do.

For more on HOW to do it, go here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

Live Long and Prosper,

Conor Kelly

When it’s good to binge

Here’s a success tip from the off the beaten path…

You know how most of us binge on TV shows or movie series?

(Thank you Netflix.)

Well, I also binge on authors.

That’s right.

When I find someone who’s either (a) doing something I’d want to be doing, or (b) onto something I think is unique and valuable, I’ll crawl under barbed-wire to get my hands on every nanobyte of content they’ve ever published.

I want to know EVERYTHING he or she knows.

So I read all their books.

Often two of three times.

I plug in and download their experiences, research, and anecdotes into my greedy little memory cells.

Here’s what it’s done for me: it’s made me both deep and broad in my knowledge.

This helps me make informed decisions about my life.

(Sometimes.)

And clients are often surprised by the range of topics I know about.

Trust me that’s a good thing.

It instantly raises your value in their eyes.

That’s why, regardless of what you do for work, I suggest you give Conor’s hearty wisdom binge a go.  I’ve never read about this concept anywhere, nor heard it mentioned in the context of personal development or success, but this little battle tactic has won me a few victories in my day.

With the above in mind, I’d invite you to binge on ME for the next 30 days.

That’s why I created my 30 Day Transformation email series.

It’s one tip a day of the best my brain has to offer.  Read each one in the comfort and privacy of your inbox.  Also, I’m including a very rare bonus chapter I wrote on the #1 Key To Transformation.

Last call for Conor-hol here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

Happy Bingeing,

Conor Kelly

25 no b.s. body transformation tips

I’ll make this real simple for you…

Print this list, put it on your fridge, make these tips a part of your life and you’ll already be 80% closer to your body goals this year.

Alright?

Giddyup.

1. Avoid doing too much, too soon.

2. Each week, eat a bit better than last week.

3  Set a personal best of some kind in every workout.

4. Make your goals about things you can control vs. things you can’t (e.g. ‘do five workouts this week’ vs. ‘lose ten pounds this month’).

5. Treat yourself like someone you’re responsible for helping.

(Stole that one from Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules For Life.)

6. You can’t out-train a bad diet.

7. Drink 1L of water before breakfast and at least 1 more liter throughout the day.

8. Supplement with EFA’s daily.

9. Stop all complaining.

10. Embrace repetition.  Success is a few key things done well over and over again.

11. Consume 30 grams of protein within 30 minutes of waking up.  Just maybe not immediately after the 1L of water I told you to drink in #7.  I won’t be responsible for what happens if you do.

12. Do something nice for someone today.

13. Use the 5×5 rule: no carbs after 5PM/5 nights per week.

14. Learn to relax.

15. Play the long game.  It most likely took you years to gain the fat so be patient.  Consistency + time = results.

16. Cut back on coffee and alcohol.

17. Sleep at least 7 hours a night.

18. Prioritize strength training.

19. Walk more.  Spend more time outside.

20. Pay attention to what you’re doing with your body.  Stand tall.  Shoulders back.  Consciously try to relax any areas of tension.  Come back to your breath.  Breathe deeply.

21. Meditate.

22. Pick foods with only one ingredient.

23. Don’t overdo your cardio.  It’ll tank your metabolism.

24. Avoid sugar.

25. If you only focus on results, you’ll never see change.  If you focus on change, you’ll always see results.

BONUS TIP: Accept screw-ups lightly.  Being able to laugh when things don’t go to plan is a highly under-rated success characteristic.  Simply correct and continue.

For more, get my 30 Day Transformation email series.  One very timely tip per day to keep your transformation engines a hummin’.

Get your good feelz here:

Click here to subscribe to The Conz’ 30 Day Transformation Series.

Happy Transforming,

Conor Kelly

A little known Harvey Specter success secret

I’ve recently taken to watching old episodes of Suits.

Why?

Two words: Harvey Specter.

If you haven’t seen the show, it’s set in the high stakes world of corporate law with its big dollar deals, cut-throat maneuvers, and boardroom-sized egos.

Harvey Specter is the hot-shot “closer” with a reputation for winning.

He may be fictional, but a fine study of success traits doth Mr. Specter make.

Unapologetic in his ambition, Harvey is an incurable action-taker.  He expects to win, but doesn’t get wound up when things (temporarily) don’t go his way.  He’s got a rock solid belief in his own abilities, and regularly bets LARGE on himself.

In one episode, he makes senior partner in the firm.

There’s a board meeting to announce his promotion.

In front of the board, Jessica, the firm’s boss, pranks Harvey by making him think the equity buy-in for senior partners (a cool half a mil) is payable right away.

Harvey goes white and says: “I have to pay the whole amount now??”

Turns out he’s just playing along.

Always the smooth operator, he later hands Jessica a cheque.

She goes: “You’ve had the money since you knew about the promotion?”

“I’ve had it since I first set my eye on becoming partner,” he replies with a smirk.

You go, Harv.

That’s called being all in, my friend.

As soon as you know you want something, act NOW as though it will happen and plan accordingly.

When’s the last time you bet on yourself like that?

The fitness equivalent might be committing to four to six months of a personal training program by paying in full on the first day.

Many clients have justified their investment to me in these terms.  Most find it hard to back out once all their chips are the table.

Now here’s the not-so-dirty little secret…

You don’t need Harvey’s confidence in order to do this.

In fact, I guarantee if you’ll ignore your doubts, and simply let yourself be willing to make that bet, your confidence will climb about ten notches, right then and there.

Author Jerry Sternin once said: “it’s easier to act your way into a new way of thinking than it is to think your way into a new way of acting.”

(That’s worth re-reading.)

So borrow a page from the great Harvey Specter’s script.

Take massive action.

Bet on yourself.

Keep moving forward.

Just don’t be surprised when this works.

If you liked this, you’re gonna love my 30 Day Transformation email series.

It’s one tip a day (featuring some of my most popular emails from the last six years) to help you be the best possible version of yourself.  It also includes a rare digital copy of my book chapter on The #1 Key To Transformation.

And it’s yours with my compliments.

You can subscribe here:

http://www.conorkellypersonaltrainer.com

I’m excited.

It’s gym time, then taking Olivia to the hairdresser.

Happy Betting,

Conor Kelly

 

Why 2018 will be even better than you think

All this machinery
Making modern music
Can still be open-hearted
Not so coldly charted
It’s really just a question
Of your honesty, yeah your honesty

-Rush, The Spirit of Radio

In high school I played lead guitar for a rock band.

We covered The Eagles Hotel California in the school talent show, and sauntered to class like we were rock stars.

But the drummer of the band, Anthony, and myself, were both much more obsessed with Rush.  Anthony wanted to be Neil Peart, and I wanted to be Alex Lifeson.

A great Canadian (and Torontonian) success story, Rush has always been the quintessential rock band for rock nerds.

The level of musicianship and virtuosity the trio applied to their songwriting and concerts was, and arguably still is, unparalleled in the world of rock.

Now if you haven’t tried to cover a Rush tune, it’s the musical equivalent of reproducing a painting by Monet.

Or at least it seemed that way to a couple of high school kids.

The band’s attention to detail is so extreme, and their timing so impeccable, that it’s near impossible. Especially on their more intricate tracks.

One summer, Anthony and I spent hours rehearsing The Spirit of Radio.  We drilled the intro repeatedly, but somehow we were never quite tight enough. We missed cues, and bumbled our way through the piece’s various time changes.

We eventually got close, but it still didn’t sound like Rush.

Both of us knew it.

Then, one hazy afternoon, as we were about to call it a practice, we decided to give it one more try.  And we nailed the song!  From start to finish, and with surgical precision. It was poetry in motion. We sat frozen for a few seconds as our brains struggled to catch up with what’d just happened.

There was no one around.

Not a soul heard us that day.

But we were grinning ear to ear, and high-fiving like we’d won a Grammy or something.

I lost touch with Anthony after high school, but if I saw him today, I’d bet anything we’d point at each other and say, “Remember the Spirit of Radio?”

Every so often, life gives us moments like these.

Flashes of pure inspiration.

If there’s one thing I would wish for you in 2018, it’s to be more deliberate in carving out your very own living snapshots, somewhere between breaths, where time has no meaning.

If you start, this minute, by thinking of five experiences you’re grateful for…

…We’ll be on our way.

To more “moments” in 2018,

Conor Kelly


Introducing the personal trainer bot

According to a recent article in The Economist, personal training, like therapy, or hairdressing, is one of the few professions not at risk of being automated out of existence, due to the human touch it requires.

This led me to ponder what aspects of my job I would want automated.

Here’s a brief wish list…

1. Counting reps.  Rep counts are very personal to the person doing the lifting.  Turns out people are possessive about their pain.  Go figure.  At least, this is what I’ve discovered by consistently being wrong with my rep counts.

I’ve got a legit reason for it…

I’m studying your form and making corrections, or offering positive encouragement.

This occupies a generous amount of my computational abilities.

Therefore I might be one or two (or five) reps off.

I’ve tried explaining it’s tension that matters, and your body can’t count reps, etc., etc….but since that doesn’t seem to fly, just let a machine count the reps instead.

2. Form analysis.  I’ve gotta rely on visual cues to tell you whether you’re executing the movements correctly, or if there’s something you should do differently.  Presumably an AI could analyze every line more precisely, and contrast these with what perfect biomechanics look like given your body structure.

Then, electrodes could be attached to working areas, contracting and relaxing the muscles involved in the right sequence, thus enabling you to feel perfect form before you master it.

In the future, I’ll conduct our training sessions sitting behind a computer screen, from where I’ll more or less *supervise*, otherwise known as taking a nap.

3. Sympathy.  I’ve been told sympathy’s not my strong suit.

Whatever.

The trainer bot can easily be programmed to convey a range of pre-recorded platitudes such as “I’m sorry to hear that”, “I understand”, or “that looked like it really hurt, how terrible…I wish there was an easier way.”

Sure this one could use a bit more work, but it’s a step up from my standard response, which is to smile with intense satisfaction whenever you complain of how hard the workout is.

At the end of the day, a machine can’t be programmed to care about your success as much as I do.

So if you’re willing to put up with inaccurate counting, form analysis that’s not exact to the millimeter, and a dark void where you think sympathy should be found, call me at (416) 826-4844 for your complimentary personal training consultation.

Your results may not be automatic, but you’ll be miles ahead of what you can achieve working on your own.

And besides, a little human interaction never hurt anyone.  Wait…

Happy Counting,

Conor Kelly