Mission 2045: Immortality

“I’ll tell you a secret…something they don’t teach you in your temple.  The Gods envy us.  They envy us because we’re mortal.  Because any moment might be our last, everything’s more beautiful.” –Achilles, to a captive Briseis in Troy

Author Ray Kurzweil, in his best-selling 2006 book The Singularity Is Near, predicted that thanks to advances in genetics, nanotechnology (such as tiny robots that will repair our cells from the inside), and artificial intelligence, anyone who makes it to 2045 will basically live forever.

The race is on.

There is of course the issue of whether or not we should want to live forever.

Hence my lovely, thought-provoking quote today.

Questions, questions…

***

In other longevity news, according to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency a 90-year-old American cyclist was stripped of his medal for testing positive for a banned substance.

That’s not a typo.

The man is 90 years old.

Not only is he able to get on a bike at his age…he’s still racing.

I don’t care what he’s on, unless his name is Robocop, let the guy keep his medal.

Who’s with me?

***

Our high-test nonagenarian ain’t got nothing on this guy:

French cyclist Robert Marchand announced he’s hanging up his bicycle shorts at a seasoned 106 years of age.

(That’s a lot of seasons.)

Last year, he broke the world record in the 105+ age category (a category that had to be created for him) by riding over 22KM in one hour:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UHw6MTbY3U

He’s retiring from record attempts, but says he’ll keep peddling his stationary bike at home.

Well, there you have it.

Thought I’d lay down a little inspiration for the Drive To 2045.

Effective, n’est ce pas?

Live Long & Prosper,

Conor Kelly

P.S.  Are you on LinkedIN?  If we’re not already contacts, please send me an invitation to connect here:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/conorkelly/

A 6-yr-old’s guide to writing persuasive emails

Let me share a brief story.

This story is 100% true and illustrates a rule of good copy.  Fail to do this, and dollars will leak from your emails like sand from a bucket with a hole in the bottom.  Do this, and it will instantly make your emails more persuasive.

The other day, as we were headed to school, my 6-year old daughter Olivia was giving her old man all kinds of grief.  She didn’t want to wear tights under her jeans.  She didn’t want to put her winter boots on.

I tried gentle cajoling, “ok, please just put your boots on.”

I tried explaining it’s the coldest day of the year (-12) and she’ll freeze.

Finally, we were getting late.  So I said, “I don’t want to do this but you leave me no choice.  You have until the count of three to put those boots on or they’ll be no T.V. tonight.  One…two…”

Three.

Still no boots.  BOOM. Officially sanctioned.

Fast forward to pick up.  After some pleasant exchange she queries, “what are we gonna watch tonight?”

I reply, “nothing, remember?”

At home she asks for a sheet of paper.  She begins to write.  Every now and then she stops to ask me how to spell a word.  Here then, is her first plea bargain attempt:

img_1454

Hilarious.

And written just the way she talks, “like, c’mon Dad, ugh!!”

I tell her it’s cute and funny — great start.  But here’s the problem: it’s all about how SHE feels.

What about how I feel?

Try putting yourself in my position, I say.

Show me you understand and you’re sorry — but only if you mean it.

She watches and listens intently, eyes narrowed, then picks up her pen with a fresh piece of paper.  Again she goes to work.  She gets some spelling help on the big words but the sentiment is all hers.  Here’s attempt #2:

img_1455

Much better.

(Notice the well-placed call-to-action of the yes and no boxes.)

Anyway, here’s the point…

Being cute, funny, or clever in your emails doesn’t hurt (indeed I’m using a smattering of all three right now).

But people are motivated by self-interest.

What are your market’s most fervent fears and desires?

Why should they care about what you have to say?

For more persuasive emails, then, speak to what matters to them.  And note that this has little to do the features of your service or product, and everything to do with the outcomes you create, or the problems you solve for your customers.  One of Stephen Covey’s seven habits of effective people is seek first to understand, then to be understood.

Go back and reread my second paragraph.

You’ll see how I framed my story to appeal to the reader’s self-interest.

Unfortunately, many of the newsletters I get leave it up to their subscribers to bridge that gap.

Don’t let yours be one of them.

At bedtime, Olivia said: “I learned a valuable lesson today.”

Hehe.

Hope you did too…

Happy Persuading,

Conor Kelly

P.S. I’m looking for one more case study to add to the collection.  If you’d like me to do all this “marketing stuff” for you, just reply “Case Study” in the comments, and I’ll get you all the details. 🙂

 

Could this be the most overlooked success skill?

I’ve been ruminating on the Arnold Schwarzenegger clip I shared earlier this week.

(I link to it below.)

All the books, audios, and courses I’ve ingested have more or less turned my brain into a search bar for self-help content.  Re: Arnie’s comment on it being ok to fail, the software of my memory turned up this little ditty…

I recall someone saying that the most remarkable thing about Fred Smith, the founder of FedEx, was his ability to laugh at failure.

Whenever one of their initiatives flopped, and many did, he’d get a wry smile on his face, shake his head and go “wow that really didn’t work.”

Then, he’d simply say “what next?”

If I was to rewind to when I started Evolution Fitness and catalog for you all the things we tried, it would fill a few journals (and indeed it does – I kept all my notes from that period).  Looking back, most of them didn’t work.  A few did.

It’s why we even had a business at all.

During my brief stint in stand-up comedy, I wrote pages full of set ups and punchlines.  I quickly realized about 10% of it was funny.  The catch is the only way to know which 10% to keep is to stand in front of people and let 90% of your stuff bomb.  Do that ten times and you wind up with five minutes of material that will do reasonably well with most audiences.

Call it accelerated failing.

The interesting thing is, in either case it never occurred to me those failures could be reasons to stop.  I just figured that was the process.  Sounds like Fred Smith had the same idea.

In fact, I’ll go you one further…

The more I fail, the smarter I get.

Besides, if that’s your approach, and every attempt results in either a win or a lesson…

Do we ever truly fail?

Here’s that video again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNpEFf0I60M

Happy Failing,

Conor Kelly

P.S. Go here:

=>How I Get My Clients 3x-10x Their Email Marketing Results.

Why spellcheck might be killing your sales

Here’s a strange story for you.

A few years ago a company called Porter Stansberry Research used a plain Jane video sales letter to sell a whopping $200M worth of subscriptions to their Investment Advisory.

The video was called End of America.

(You can watch it on YouTube if you’re curious.)

I mean this thing is ghetto.

It’s black and white, and conspicuous by its lack of images…in fact, there are no graphics at all, just words.

The late, great Eugene Schwartz, the Granddaddy of the modern copywriter was famous for saying:

“The ugly thing in the world of beauty stands out.”

(The video also tells a great story, topic for another time…)

Similarly, when most businesses are sending slick-looking, branded HTML newsletters with fancy graphics, your plain text emails complete with typos and all stand out.

I’d go as far as to say that trying to make your emails ‘professional’ is the kiss of death.

For one, professional is common, drab and uninteresting.  And it screams corporate – a good way to ensure no one cares about your emails.  Finally, many of the newsletters I review are busy, click-baited hot-messes that lack a clear call to action.

The best emails are simple and personal.

Like a message from a friend.

And most people that are not corporate mouthpieces write in a conversational tone, use imperfect grammar, and can’t spell worth a dime.

As hard as it will be for the graphic designers of the world to swallow, looking good and making sales – sometimes – are competing ideals.

To learn more about how my simple email system can generate a flood of new clients for you, mosey on over here to book your stress-free brainstorm call:

http://calendly.com/conorkel/emailincome

Happy Misspelling,

Conor Kelly

“The Muscle” @Marketing Muscle

The #1 most important line in any email

What is the most important line in any email?

I’ll give you a hint.

It’s NOT…

*your opener

*your subject line

*your call-to-action

Or even your link.

Would you like me to tell you what it is?

Ok, enough suspense.

The #1 most important part of any email is…

The sender’s name.

That’s right.

WHO the email is from matters more than almost anything else.

It’s not that things like subject lines aren’t important.  Indeed, if you know your market well (and you should) there are ways to make your subject lines almost impossible to ignore – like an itch they simply have to scratch.

But if your subscribers know, like, and trust YOU…

THAT’s what ultimately gets them to open your emails and devour your words like freshly baked cookies.

You see, intelligent email marketing is about the relationship.

And relationships are like bank accounts.

Every time you send a funny, inspiring, or personal note with a story, a relevant tip, or an interesting fact, you make a deposit.

(And the great thing about email is it’s easy to make REGULAR deposits.)

If all you do pitch, pitch, pitch… or you’re (gasp!) boring…or if your emails are about your product or service and not your reader’s problems… you make a withdrawal.  Then you risk your sendee losing interest or worse, tuning you out altogether.

On the other hand, when the relationship account is sporting a healthy balance, the people on your list who vibe with what you do will be delighted to see your name in bold when it pops up in their inbox.  “More cookies, yay!” is what bubbles up from their subconscious.

Then, not only are you welcome to send them more emails, but you can sell them more of your service or product via said emails.

See how that works?

That’s accounting I like.

Remember, lead with a giving hand and you won’t go too far from the mark.

Before you hit send, ask yourself, “Will this serve in some way”?

Happy Depositing,

Conor Kelly

P.S.  Find out how I get my clients 3x-10x their sales by sending simple fun emails like this one.  Schedule your Email Income Consultation today by replying to this email or going here:

http://calendly.com/conorkel/emailincome

Confidence secrets of a 6-time Mr. Olympia

Today, inspiration from an unlikely place…

The sport of professional bodybuilding.

When I first became interested in it, the guy at the top was 6-time Mr. Olympia Dorian Yates.  Widely credited with ushering in the ‘mass monster’ era of bodybuilding, Dorian brought to the stage a combination of dense muscle and conditioning (which means little-to-no fat or water retention under the skin, creating a peeled, anatomy chart look) that had never been seen before.

I recently came across a great interview with Dorian on YouTube.

In the interview, he’s asked about 8-time Mr. Olympia Lee Haney.  At the time Dorian was coming up in the sport, Lee Haney had a lock on the title.  A living legend, he was arguably the greatest Mr. Olympia ever.

In a very telling segment, Dorian discusses the mental shifts that needed happen in order for him to believe he could unseat the ‘unbeatable’ Haney, a man he considered his idol.

The first was to give up this idol-worship.

He took this opportunity when he won his first big pro show.  He started asking himself, “why not?”  “Why couldn’t I beat him”?  In any achievement, that’s step one.  You see, often we want things for our lives – big things – and we get hung up on the question of *how*.  But this only makes those big things seem bigger.

What you should ask yourself instead is *why not*?

Admitting, as a bare minimum, that your goal is possible releases the big R – Resistance – and frees you to entertain new *how’s* you didn’t previously see.

The second confidence shift was a by-product of his preparation.

In Dorian’s words:

One thing I can guarantee is he does not train as hard as me.  He does not dedicate himself as much as me.  How do I know that?  Because it’s not possible.  It’s not possible to be training harder, or more consistently, or more dedicated than me, because I couldn’t give a single ounce more to any aspect of this thing that I’m doing.  So that makes me feel pretty powerful and pretty confident.  Because I know other people are slacking – sometimes.

Here’s what I love about this:

It’s 100% PROCESS FOCUSED.

As counter-intuitive as it may seem, the best way to reach your goals is to not have goals – at least not ones that are tied to outcomes.  Have an intention, or a vision of where you want to go.  Then, make your goals about things you can control.

You have zero control over what happens.

But you have at least some control over what you DO.

In 2006, when I finally ditched the fat suit I’d donned for ten years, losing over 30 pounds in four months, I didn’t once look in the mirror during that time.

Instead, I put my head down, attacked the process, and didn’t come up for air until four months later.

I made it my sole preoccupation to do everything I possibly could, training and diet-wise, and to leave no T uncrossed and no I un-dotted.

And boy did it work.

By the time I emerged from this deep dive into my plan I didn’t look like the same person.  And in only four months.  You could have stuck me on a conveyor belt that turns out lean bodies, if there was such a thing, and the effect would have been much the same.

I’m not saying what you want will happen in four months.  Whatever transformation you seek could take 6 months…two years.  Forget about the timeline.  Again, it’s counter-intuitive, but renouncing your attachment to outcomes often speeds up the result.

Instead, put your blinders on, and dominate your path.

This is not about perfection.

It’s about focus.

Simply give no time, attention, or energy to anything other than doing the best you can do – on the things you can control – at any given moment.  Do this moment well…and then the next…and then the next…things will turn out fine.

There is PEACE in the process.

There is POWER in the process.

YOUR CONFIDENCE is in the process.

Embrace it.

Dorian Yates never did beat Lee Haney.  He placed second to him in 1991.  Then, Haney retired.  Would he have beaten him?  We’ll never know.  But it was Dorian’s willingness to ask *why not* and his utterly ruthless dedication to the process that delivered him his own lock on the title for six years – and legendary status in the sport he loves.

Happy Process-Focusing,

Conor Kelly

P.S. You can check out Dorian Yates comments on Lee Haney here (very revealing):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVYIcigwPok

P.P.S .  According to McKinsey, you are 40x more likely to get a client with email than with social media.  For tips on how to get more clients with email, click here.

What 70.9% of consumers say would make them STOP doing business with you

One of my longest suffering victims…er, I mean clients should be a sit-com character.

The one-liners come fast and furious with this dude, I’m tellin’ ya.

We met when he showed up at my doorstep asking about personal training.

I mentioned our 16-week program and he protested.

“That’s too much of a commitment.”

And while I generally wouldn’t take a lesser contract, I was intrigued by his quirkiness.  So I sold him a month’s worth of sessions.  He rolled it over the following month, and the next…and the next…and here we are, eight years later.

Now we laugh about a time when four months was ‘unreasonable’.

Every time his sessions are up (he calls it *pay day*), it inspires another round of witty back and forth between us.

He claims I give him a better session because I haven’t been paid yet.  He threatens to postpone payment another few sessions to keep the heightened love and attention rolling.  I promise to give away his spot because he’s so ‘unreliable’.

It’s all in the spirit of a good laugh.

Retail Marketing Institute recently wrote that 70.9% of customers would STOP doing business with someone and go somewhere else if it was more FUN.

Yes, your clients want results.

But they also want good experiences.

My former head trainer did a masterful job with this.  People loved to do business with him.  Even when booking an intro session over the phone, if the prospect asked “should I bring anything?”, he’d say, “Just your credit card.”  But he was so affable and charming about it he’d invariably get a chuckle followed by a “will do.”

Just planting some seeds here…

How could you do an even better job of creating the kind of experiences that’ll make your clients want to tell others about you?

Good one to chew on.

Hmm…I do have a suggestion.

How about sending your customers two or three emails per week, which, like this note are concise, fun, engaging and deliver a valuable idea or tip — all while promoting YOU or YOUR SERVICES?

Like that one?

Thought so.

Find out how.

Get your Email Income Consultation here:

https://calendly.com/conorkel

Happy Funny,

Conor Kelly